Home Learning During a Pandemic: What Works and What Doesn’t

Home Learning During a Pandemic: What Works and What Doesn’t

 

The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has caused widespread panic and prompted schools to consider closing in order to prevent contagion within the school environment.

The idea of canceling school is an appealing one, but it comes with its own set of problems and responsibilities. No matter what you decide, it’s important to keep your students up-to-date on the situation so they don’t feel left out or neglected while you tend to other business matters.

Here are some suggestions on how you can keep students connected without neglecting your responsibilities as a parent, guardian, or educator during this difficult time.

 

Homework Helps Schools Track Absenteeism

As the Covid-19 pandemic continues, schools are struggling to keep track of student learning. One way they’re doing this is by sending home learning packets for students to complete.

While this helps schools keep track of what students are doing, it doesn’t necessarily help them improve their academic performance. In fact, research suggests that homework generally has little impact on student achievement.

So what does work when it comes to home learning? Research indicates that programs like Reading Break or KIDS LEARN in which parents work with their children at home have been shown to lead to better outcomes for both parents and children.

These programs are designed around three key principles: (1) engaging adults in a dialogue about literacy with their children; (2) fostering parents’ literacy skills through adult reading instruction; and (3) creating spaces where families can talk about books together.

 

Homework Assignments Can Help Kids Avoid Falling Behind

The coronavirus pandemic has forced schools across the country to close their doors, leaving parents to pick up the slack when it comes to their child’s education. While there are many online resources available, it can be tough to know what will work best for your family.

 

Homework Boosts a Child’s Confidence

One of the biggest benefits of homework is that it can help boost a child’s confidence. When children are able to complete their homework and get good grades, they feel good about themselves and their abilities.

This boost in confidence can carry over into other areas of their lives, such as their social life and academics. Additionally, homework can help children learn how to manage their time and responsibility.

A child may have difficulty with this during a pandemic when we all take on extra responsibilities. It will be very important for kids to know how to take care of themselves while taking care of others.

Homework helps them prepare for this scenario. Our goal is not just to keep our kids happy and healthy, but also safe from harm (e.g., bullying).

The most effective way to protect your child from bullies during a pandemic is by teaching them how to cope with being bullied. Kids who stay home from school often face bullying at home or elsewhere in the community because they’re singled out by classmates for missing school.

 

Homework Takes Time Away From Other Activities

Covid has forced many schools to close their doors and send students home to learn. This has been a hard adjustment for everyone. One of the challenges is that homework takes time away from other activities that are important for kids, like playing outside, doing chores, or spending time with family.

Here are some tips to help manage homework time during a pandemic. 1) Allow your child to use an online curriculum program for one day a week. This can allow you more time with your child during the week and it also frees up about 20 minutes each day for your child to do extra work.

2) Make it clear that homework should be done as soon as possible rather than waiting until just before bedtime. It’s easier to get organized in the morning if they know they only have 3 hours after school before they need to start bedtime routines.

3) Consider reducing homework assignments by half – this will give them more free time each day and make it less likely that they’ll have too much work on their plate when they’re feeling ill or overwhelmed.

 

Homework Can be Addictive for Parents and Children

For parents, homework can be a source of stress and anxiety. After a long day of work, the last thing they want to do is help their child with math homework. And for children, homework can be a source of frustration and boredom.

But what if there was a way to make homework more enjoyable for both parents and children? What if we were able to change how we approach homework by creating engaging tasks that are open-ended instead of giving students specific instructions on how to complete an assignment? This method is referred to as unbundled or open-ended home learning.

The idea behind unbundled or open-ended home learning is that students have more choice in what they learn, so it becomes less about meeting expectations and more about fulfilling curiosity.

Covid Home Learning lets you create assignments where your child can explore topics that interest them (math concepts, science experiments, geography lessons) without following a set curriculum. Learning During a Pandemic: What Works and What Doesn’t

The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has caused widespread panic and prompted schools to consider closing in order to prevent contagion within the school environment. The idea of canceling school is an appealing one, but it comes with its own set of problems and responsibilities.

No matter what you decide, it’s important to keep your students up-to-date on the situation so they don’t feel left out or neglected while you tend to other business matters. Here are some suggestions on how you can keep students connected without neglecting your responsibilities as a parent, guardian, or educator during this difficult time.

Homework Helps Schools Track Absenteeism
As the Covid-19 pandemic continues, schools are struggling to keep track of student learning. One way they’re doing this is by sending home learning packets for students to complete.

While this helps schools keep track of what students are doing, it doesn’t necessarily help them improve their academic performance. In fact, research suggests that homework generally has little impact on student achievement.

So what does work when it comes to home learning? Research indicates that programs like Reading Break or KIDS LEARN in which parents work with their children at home have been shown to lead to better outcomes for both parents and children.

These programs are designed around three key principles: (1) engaging adults in a dialogue about literacy with their children; (2) fostering parents’ literacy skills through adult reading instruction; and (3) creating spaces where families can talk about books together.

Homework Assignments Can Help Kids Avoid Falling Behind
The coronavirus pandemic has forced schools across the country to close their doors, leaving parents to pick up the slack when it comes to their child’s education. While there are many online resources available, it can be tough to know what will work best for your family.

Homework Boosts a Child’s Confidence
One of the biggest benefits of homework is that it can help boost a child’s confidence. When children are able to complete their homework and get good grades, they feel good about themselves and their abilities.

This boost in confidence can carry over into other areas of their lives, such as their social life and academics. Additionally, homework can help children learn how to manage their time and responsibility.

A child may have difficulty with this during a pandemic when we all take on extra responsibilities. It will be very important for kids to know how to take care of themselves while taking care of others. Homework helps them prepare for this scenario.

Our goal is not just to keep our kids happy and healthy, but also safe from harm (e.g., bullying). The most effective way to protect your child from bullies during a pandemic is by teaching them how to cope with being bullied. Kids who stay home from school often face bullying at home or elsewhere in the community because they’re singled out by classmates for missing school.

Homework Takes Time Away From Other Activities
Covid has forced many schools to close their doors and send students home to learn. This has been a hard adjustment for everyone. One of the challenges is that homework takes time away from other activities that are important for kids, like playing outside, doing chores, or spending time with family.

Here are some tips to help manage homework time during a pandemic. 1) Allow your child to use an online curriculum program for one day a week.

This can allow you more time with your child during the week and it also frees up about 20 minutes each day for your child to do extra work. 2) Make it clear that homework should be done as soon as possible rather than waiting until just before bedtime.

It’s easier to get organized in the morning if they know they only have 3 hours after school before they need to start bedtime routines. 3) Consider reducing homework assignments by half – this will give them more free time each day and make it less likely that they’ll have too much work on their plate when they’re feeling ill or overwhelmed.

Homework Can be Addictive for Parents and Children
For parents, homework can be a source of stress and anxiety. After a long day of work, the last thing they want to do is help their child with math homework. And for children, homework can be a source of frustration and boredom.

But what if there was a way to make homework more enjoyable for both parents and children? What if we were able to change how we approach homework by creating engaging tasks that are open-ended instead of giving students specific instructions on how to complete an assignment? This method is referred to as unbundled or open-ended home learning.

The idea behind unbundled or open-ended home learning is that students have more choice in what they learn, so it becomes less about meeting expectations and more about fulfilling curiosity.

Covid Home Learning lets you create assignments where your child can explore topics that interest them (math concepts, science experiments, geography lessons) without following a set curriculum.

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